1 es)!

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SECTION EDITED BY FEDERAL ARCHITECTS

OCTOBER

93!

A few recently-built houses... all with

Anaconda Economy Copper Roofing

ROVIDING all of copper’s traditional

charm and dignity, Anaconda Economy Cop- per Roofing is offered especially for residential use. Lighter weight (10 oz. metal) reduces cost. Narrower sheets (13%4/’ between seams) are more in keeping with small roof areas, and pro- vide approximately the same rigidity and wind resistance as wider sheets of heavier metal. Experienced shéet metal contractors everywhere can apply Anaconda Economy Copper

7 . AnaconnA Roofing. See our catalogue in Sweet's. “= Fret 8 8 37221 =

~e=-

ay a ae THE AMERICAN BRASS COMPANY 1936 Good Housekeeping House in Wychwood, Westfield, N. J. General Offices: Waterbury, Conn. Offices and Agencies in Principal Citie Architect: Dwight James Baum, Riverdale-on-Hudson, a In Canada: ANACONDA AMERICAN BRASS LTD., New Toronto, Ontario

“Character Home’’ was built by Hutzler & Carr, Inc., in Richmond, Built in Marblehead, Mass., and designed by Donald C. Goss, Va. Architect: Edward F. Sinnott, Richmond, Va. Architect, Boston, Mass. Copper was used extensively throughout.

Here copper graces a really ‘small house,”’ built as a Model F.H. A. This home with Anaconda Copper roof is in Newton Highlands, home by Andrew H. Larsen at Waterbury, Conn. Mass. Built by Davis & Vaughan, Boston, Mass.

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in their homes...

Air is cleansed, tempered (kept at Economical steel boiler radiator

even temperature), humidified and heat is supplied to such rooms as circulated in such rooms as living bath, kitchen and garage, where room, dining room, bedrooms, etc. air conditioning is not desired.

@ HOT WATER! 4

i oe wi \% Pa —_ y iy ra LS a am en “— ~~, , = eneot La a “f= The compact attractive unit, with Abundant clean hot waiter is sup- burner or stoker enclosed behind plied summer and winter—at re- easily removed panels, makes the markably low cost. No tank or extra basement room practicable other outside accessory is required. even in the small home. The larg- Hot water flows from the Fitz- est model occupies only 4’ 6” by gibbons TANKSAVER, a _ copper 2’ 5” of floor space. coil submerged inside the boiler.

Probably no other single piece of equipment in the modern home provides so many services essential to the comfort and well-being of the owner and his family. The Fitzgibbons Boiler-Airconditioner meets every con- dition, supplying the desired proportion of conditioned air and radiator heat, and year-round domestic hot water as required. This flexibility is appreciated alike by archi- tects, builders, heating contractors and homeowners.

With all this, the operating economy of approved copper-steel boiler design, in types for any modern fuel and method of automatic firing .. . the beauty to grace any basement extra room .. . and the assurance of com- plete all-round satisfaction.

Write for the catalog and full specifications.

Fitzgibbons Boiler Company, inc.

General Offices: ARCHITECTS BLDG., 101 PARK AVE., NEW YORK, N. Y. Works: OSWEGO, N. Y. Branches and Representatives in Principal Cities Distributed in Canada by Fess Oil Burners of Canada, Ltd., Toronto and Montreal

AIR-CONDITIONING

Provide them with

FITZGIBBONS

“Split-system”’

The FITZGIBBONS BOILER -AIRCONDITIONER

Made in types for oil burner, gas burner, stoker. In most cases the firing unit is

mounted in- side the jacket, behind easily removable panels con- cealed yei readily acces- sible.

American Architect and Architecture, published monthly by Hearst

. under the act of March 3rd, 1879.

AMERICAN ARCHITECT AND ARCHITECTURE, OCTOBER

Magazines $3.00 per year; Canada, $4.00; "Foreign, $5.00. Entered as second class matter

Issue 1937

2662,

Inc., 572 Madison Avenue. New April 5th, 1926, dated October,

at the Post Offic 1937.

York, N

e at New ¥

\

rk,

| Koya wKoselothtele me Motues— VOLUMES of WATER Specify

YERS WROUGHT IRON

@ When it comes to handling large volumes of water, in swimming pools, filtration plants, sewage treatment and in air conditioning, you are sure to face the corrosion problem.

Because wrought iron has given years of long life and economy under these conditions, that is why you should give it careful consideration before writing the specifications.

In the North Park Swimming Pool and Bathhouse at Pittsburgh, recently constructed under J. L. Laboon, Direc- tor of Public Works, the application of Byers Wrought Iron will suggest many

specific uses for this corrosion-resist- ing material.

Byers Wrought Iron Pipe was used for all raw water supply lines, return lines from pool, scum gutter lines, recirculation lines, suction lines, waste lines, vents and leaders in bathhouse. Also all railings and stairway to obser- vation platform were made of Byers Wrought Iron pipe, plates and bars.

Wherever corrosion is a problem be sure you re- view wrought

Specify Byers Genuine Wrought Iron Pipe for corrosive services and Byers Steel Pipe for your other requirements

AMERICAN ARCHITECT AND ARCHITECTURE,

BYERS

GENUINE’ WROUGHT IRON

Tubular and Flat Rolled Products

iron‘s record before specifying the ma- terial. If there is any question about corrosive conditions let us work with you in making a corrosion study. Com- plete information and engineering as- sistance are readily available through our nearest Division Office or from our Engineering Service Department in Pittsburgh. A. M. Byers Co. Estab. 1864. Pittsburgh, Boston, New York, Philadel- phia, Washing- ton, Chicago, St. Louis, Hous- ton, Seattle, San Francisco.

OCTOBER 1937

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AMERICAN

ARCHITECT

AND ARCHITECTURE

CONTENTS COVER. Cupola of the old church (1806) at Benn Vt. Ast B From a photograph by Frank J. R OCTOBER 1937 TRENDS ........ 8 FEDERAL ARCHITECTS AT EASE 19 | ee 25 KennetH Kincstey Stowe, A.LA. WE VIEW WITH ALARM. Federa! arch ts from c e ditor . 2% megazine Sees ees ee Henry H. Saytor, A.A. Associate Editor ARCHITECTURAL OVERTONES. New England Chu h Sar WALTER SANDERS Chamberlain 43 Associate Editor i iti CIBA PHARMACEUTICAL PRODUCTS BUILDING, Summit, N F Managing Editor architect; Briggs & Stelling, landscape chitects 51 y Rocer WADE SHERMAN a Technical Editor OFFICES FOR A FOUNDATION, New York, N. Y. C.C ie 57 Tyter STEWART ROGERS es Director of Technical Service CAFE, CHAMPAIGN, ILL. William A. Gans arch t; A F n R. F. GarpNer ' 5 61 General Manager James D. Hogan, color T. W. Tower a = Advertising Manager THE DIARY. Henry Say 65 ames A. RIcE THE PORTFOLIO. Entrance Doorway Steps 67 Western Manager : en : FAVORITE FEATURES. Simple Mantels 79 VC CLI NO. 2662 HOUSE OF DR. F. F. HARRISON, Cooperstown, N. Y. G R AMERICAN ARCHITECT (Trade-Mark vn a, Coe | associate 83 Reg. U S Patent Office), with which is com- ve 3 o VERT s Ole g990 bined ARCHITECTURE (Reg U S. Patent 87 Office). Published monthly by Hearst Maga- x ~_» ammre n F . zines Inc., 572 Madison Avenue, New JOHN RUSSELL POPE, 1874-1937. A oe York Other Offices 919 N. Michigan Ave- = Y nue, Chicago, General Motors Bldg., Detroit , RECENT EXAMPLES OF BRICK BUILDINGS: Tubercu Hospital. R WwW. V 132 Newbury Street, Boston. William Ran- 7 js ne etd ae P dolph Hearst, President, Richard E Berlin, Frede Faris, architec High Schoc Fruita, Colo H. Buell & C Mer Executive Vice President, John Randolph > Cc - 1 Pp go eH C+ Mas Hearst, Vice President, Earle H McHugh, Auditorium, Sterling, Co T. H. Buell & Co., arch S las Vice President, R F Gardner, Vice Presi- ~ = Raa teas Bat nce Glenvie Wh Apart- dent, T W Towler, Vice President; W R. Un G. Loring, arc e e1sde e, Ole e v i. Peters, Treasurer, Arthur S. Moore, Secre- aa nee: a tos iaciieam gochtiawnt ao tary Copyright, 1937, by Hearst Magazines - B = N. Y., B s W. ° mar Inc. Single copies, $1.00. Subscription: United States and Possessions, $3.00 per r : Brick Masonry |1—Workman 17 na year, Canada, $4.00, Foreign, $5.00 En- TIME-SAVER STANDARDS ai tered as second class matter, April 5, 1926, Foundations: 3—Reintorced Brick Masonry 92 at Post Office, New York, under Act of March 3, 1879 American Architect and Architecture is protected by copyright and BOOKS e TECHNICAL DIGEST . TECHNIQUES e OBITUARIES nothing that appears in it may be sreproduced either wholly or in partewithout OF THE OFFICES special permission. .

The Honorable Otha D. Wearin, friend of the architects in Congress, pleads for competitions in public works . . . Talbot F. Hamlin inspects the Paris Exposition and reports upon it in detail of the new Housing Aci .

. Veteran housers comment on the possibilities . . Architectural Overtones, Impor-

AMERICAN ARCHITECT AND ARCHITECTURE, OCTOBER 19

~XUM

tant Historical Monuments of Peiping, China . . . The Portfolio,

Entrance Doorway Sidelights Favorite Features, Garage

Doors .. . Unit Planning, IX and the Time-Savers Standards will

over the subject of Hotel Bedrooms Six houses, a florist shop, factory, warehouse and several municipal buildings. 37 3

HE paint and glass products manufactured by the Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company are quality products. This Company has been a leader in glass and paint manu- facture for more than five decades, and this pioneering leadership is reflected in the quality of Pitts- burgh Paints and Pittsburgh Glass. You may specify them with the assurance that they will be worthy of your finest creations.

A complete line of Pittsburgh Prod- ucts of the following types is available through our7 4branches in leading cities:

PITTSBURGH GLASS PRODUCTS

Polished Plate Glass

Pennvernon Window Glass

Carrara Structural Glass Ornamental Glass Pittsburgh Mirrors

PITTSBURGH PAINTS

Sun-Proof Paint Wallhide Paint

Waterspar Enamel

THE FIFTH

IN A SERIES OF INTERESTING WINDOW TREATMENTS

Architect . . . Aymar Embury, Il SS

=

Waterspar Varnish Florhide Enamel

PITTCO STORE FRONT METAL

Windows glazed with Pennvernon Window Glass are better windows, | because Pennvernon is unusually transparent, free from flaws, brilliant of finish and reflective. In addition, Pennvernon’s beauty lasts longer . .. because of its dense, abrasion- resistant surface structure.

See Sweet's for complete specifications, and for addresses of Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company branches.

o, PITTSBURGH, 72 Pao PLATE GLASS COMPANY Globe.

4 AMERICAN ARCHITECT AND ARCHITECTURE, OCTOBER 1937

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get by with cheaper acoustical materials?

..- Couldn’t we

HIS architect is rendering his

client an invaluable service. He has taken a definite point of view on acoustical materials .. . and made a recommendation based on actual experience.

Experience in the durability of Johns-Manville Sound-Control Ma- terials. Knowledge of the fact that these materials retain their high rate of sound absorption throughout their entire long life . . . and are, therefore, a truly economical in-

JM

Boouc Ts

Johns-Manville

No, that’s false economy. They won’t be perman- ently effective ...and they’ll cost you more in replacement and maintenance than your orig-

inal investment in J-M Sound-Control Materials!

vestment from every standpoint.

And like all architects who have used our engineering service, he knows its value in helping to co-ordi- nate the sound-control work with his basic design . . . and in assuring the proper application of the quiet- ing treatment. Two factors as im- portant in securing effective, eco- nomical sound control as are the materials themselves.

Architects who follow his example in specifying J-M Sound-Control

Materials are looking beyond today. Are providing for that future time when the permanent efficiency and

lasting economy of these materials will constantly remind their clients of a service rendered well... and to their mutual benefit.

For the latest dataon Johns-Manville Acoustical Materials and for full de- tails on our engineering consultation service, write to Johns-Manville, 22 East 40th Street, New York City.

Sound-Control Materials and Acoustical-Engineering Service

ACTUALLY IT COSTS NO MORE TO USE THE BEST ACOUSTICAL MATERIALS

AMERICAN ARCHITECT AND ARCHITECTURE, OCTOBER 1937

5

ey

FOR SCHOOLS, HOSPITAL

2%

dl S AND

APARTMENT BUILDINGS

these new, patented

WINDOWS

have many important features

MAXIMUM VISIBILITY © WEATHERTIGHT e RUSTPROOF—NO PAINTING) e

For both health and comfort, efficient control of air and temperature is essential —in schools, hospitals and public buildings. Permatite Windows in bronze or aluminum—offer an important contribu-

tion to the solution of these problems.

Permatite Windows are weathertight. Their new, patented, metal weatherstripping forms an efficient

seal—no air, rain or dust can enter. Exhaustive engi-

REVOLVING DOORS :

WINDOWS

GENERAL BRONZE CORPORATION

34-19 Tenth Street

TABLETS

STURDY RATTLEPROOF

neering tests indicate—for both casement and double hung—an unprecedented resistance to air infiltration. This feature makes them ideal for air- conditioned buildings. In winter these windows

assure a considerable saving in fuel costs.

The high quality of workmanship and materials, and excellence of design, make Permatite Windows

suitable for all types of public buildings; they will

* ARCHITECTURAL METAL WORK

Long Island City, N.Y.

6 AMERICAN ARCHITECT AND ARCHITECTURE, OCTOBER 1937

XUM

@ Sweet's 1937 Catalog File contains 36 pages of details, speci- fications and results of laboratory infiltration tests. We invite you to con- sult Sweet's or write us for a catalog.

harmonize with any architectural treatment. They cost less than half as much as former windows of similar quality and much less efficiency.

Permatite Windows are sturdily built to withstand time, weather and hard usage. They are rattleproof; free from warping, sticking and rusting; easy to operate. No painting is necessary—the maintenance

cost is negligible. *

Before you plan your next building, we invite you to consult Sweet's or to write us for a fully illustrated

catalog giving complete construction details and

5 pect fications.

PERMATITE wINDOW S

Bronze or Aluminum + Casement or Double Hung

WINDOWS += REVOLVING DOORS = TABLETS - ARCHITECTURAL METAL WORK

GENERAL BRONZE CORPORATION

34-19 Tenth Street . , Long Island City, N.Y.

AMERICAN ARCHITECT AND ARCHITECTURE, OCTOBER 1937 7

NEWS e EVENTS e FACTS e FACES T R E N D S IDEAS e OPINIONS e COMMENTS

CONSTRUCTION

BUILDING PERMIT VALUES DURING AU- GUST, for the first time since May, reached a total slightly higher than that reported for the same month last year. According to Dun & Bradstreet’s statis- tics covering 215 cities, the aggregate value of August building permits in these centers was $87,545,062, while in August, 1936, the total was $83,109,753. This year’s increase amounts to 5.3%; how- ever, August figures compared with those for the preceding month of July show a drop of 4.1% as against a usually ex- pected gain of about 1%. Excluding New York City from the totals, the rest of the country registered a rise of 4.7%. For the year to date, value of building permits throughout the nation stands 19.1% ahead of 1936.

THAT MILITANT JOURNAL, NEWS & OPIN- 1ON— published by New York’s Building Trade Employers its recent warning to prospective builders

Association—repeats

that there is no chance for lessened build- ing costs within the next eighteen months, and that if any construction is contem- plated it might as well be done now. La- bor prices are now governed in most cases by signed wages and hours agreements, and, according to NV & O, there is little chance that anything will happen to bring about a reduction. The new Wagner Housing bill, it is stated, acts to prevent any such labor cost drop through its pre- vailing wage clause. It would take a very

© UNIVERSAL PRESS PHOTO AGENCY, ITALY

large decline in material expenses to off- set increased labor costs, says N & O, and such a decline is not anticipated.

LITTLE COMFORT TO HOLDERS OF AN OPPOSITE VIEWPOINT is to be found in the American Federation of Labor’s Sep- tember Survey of Business. This bulletin takes the premise, which may seem sort of cart-before-horse-like to some, that any worker whose pay envelope this fall does not bring him 5% more than last fall will be forced to adopt a lower standard of living. Furthermore; workers whose pay envelope is not more than 5% above last year, although the same living stan- dard can be preserved, will fall behind the “March of Progress.” And ending on an altruistic note, the bulletin ob- “Organized labor will do indus- try a service by seeing to it that wages continue to advance substantially this fall. Equitable sharing by labor in the increas- ing wealth produced per worker is the way to avoid speculation and inflation and build our business progress on a sure foundation.”

serves ;

REFLECTING THE IMPORTANCE OF CON- STRUCTION to the national well-being, some interesting statistics have just been released by the Chamber of Commerce of the United States. Among the facts which catch our eye are these: From a peak of $11,060,000,000 in 1928 the vol- ume of construction decreased to a low of $3,002,000,000 in 1933. It increased to $6,784,000,000 in 1936.

Private residential construction ac- counted for 39.2% of the total construc- tion outlay in 1923 and only 18.4% in 1936.

“Overcrowding” of dwellings is much less in the United States than in many foreign countries, the percentage of such over-crowded dwellings ranging from 3°, in England to 1.4% in 64 American cities.

During the present decade the aver- age annual increase in the number of families will 475,000 to 500,000.

The average annual number of family dwelling units upon which construction was started was 677,000 in the decade 1920-29 and only 165,000 in the seven years 1930-36.

The total number of dwelling units built or under construction by the fed- eral government to date is only 27,161.

The greatest lag has been in the con- struction of low cost housing.

The number of firms engaged in con- tract construction decreased from 135,057 in 1929 to 75,047 in 1935.

Regular construction employment reached a peak of 2,888,000 in 1928 and declined to 629,000 in 1934, recovering to 1,210,000 at the 1936 peak.

Savings and loan associations hold 23.1% and private individuals 21.4% of the $17,740,000,000 of home mortgages outstanding.

approximate

WHAT THIS COUNTRY NEEDS, holds a

writer in the New York Herald Tribune,

Italy has been holding her Fourth International Exhibition of Cinema at the Lido of Venice, for which this Palace of the Exhibition was built from the designs of Luigi Quagliata

8 AMERICAN ARCHITECT AND ARCHITECTURE, OCTOBER 1937

ps

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S phecity Welding

_ for leakproof piping systems

RCHITECTS and designers can provide A a permanently leakproof piping system for their clients by specifying that all pipe lengths be joined by oxy-acetylene welding. A welded system has welds instead of joints—

and every properly welded joint is as de-

pendable, strong, tough, ductile and corrosion-

resistant as the pipe itself. The welded system

minimizes expensive leaks and servicing.

Furthermore, this method of construction sim- plifies every step in the installation of pipe from the drawings to the insulating of the completed line.

Linde engineers are skilled in designing and constructing oxy-acetylene welded pipe in-

stallations. Their wide experience and coop-

eration are available to assist you. Write for

complete information and ask how you may

PIPE SECTIONS JOINED BY WELD obtain the 200-page book, ‘Design of Welded ING can fit into the same space as re > . - a

the pipe itself because the welds, Piping.” The Linde Air Products Company, “W,” become part of the pipe. Oxy- acetylene welding makes the pip- ing system an integral, permanent tion, New York and principal cities. unit, smooth inside and outside.

Unit of Union Carbide and Carbon Corpora-

Visit the Linde Exhibit »Y Booth H52 National Metal Show Atlantic Citv. N. J. October 18-22, 1937

Everything for Oxy-Acetylene Welding and Cutting

}PR T wT i wc dliaietigpes osipiplagiinien sili a 3 ~ = ereemaaiinn LINDE OXYGEN ¢ PREST-O-LITE ACETYLENE « OXWELD APPARATUS AND SUPPLIES FROM 4 UNION CARBIDE edie es lente acmatineaies reel i oat sii a na 4 es teat

WiON CARBIDE AND ARBON CORPORATION

AMERICAN ARCHITECT AND ARCHITECTURE, OCTOBER 1937 9

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a

~ OR SOE ap Ya ey

New Jersey approach to the Midtown Hudson Tunnel now

air nn J IN ij: being constructed by the Port y

of New York Authority. if

‘7

MAN’S NEWEST UNDER-RIVER ACHIEVEMENT

stavtid witte a

A THIRD great. link brings New York and its neighbor- ing communities minutes closer! Soon the Midtown INTERESTING DATA

Tunnel (to be renamed the Lincoln Tunnel) will help the Length of first (south) downtown Holland Tunnel and the uptown George Wash- tube ........... 8,215 feet ington Bridge in the gigantic task of carrying the ever- Diameter of shell .... 31 feet : : Number of vehicles per increasing traffic between New York and New Jersey. coo cher. eens First came ideas, then rough sketches, finaily finished Cost of complete proj- drawings—all along the line pencils played an important OW on sesenees $74,800,000

part. And, interestingly enough—Venus Pencils—will be- come now one of the beneficiaries of this new conve- nience. For the tunnel will mean even speedier shipments of these famous pencils from Hoboken to New York.

We are proud that in New York and throughout the world, in offices and drafting rooms where such outstand- ing achievements are taking place, Venus Drawing Pencils are sure to be found. It's good testimony to the fact that they are the world's finest!

Venus Drawing Pencils come in 17 shades of black. The Colloidal Process* and other scientific methods assure you that each is graded with unvarying accuracy—that each is perfectly smooth.

PENCILS

10°

AMERICAN PENCIL COMPANY ee Hoboken, New Jersey

Also made in Canada by Venus Pencil Company, Ltd., Toronto

*U. S. Pat. No. 1,738,888. e

10 AMERICAN ARCHITECT AND ARCHITECTURE, OCTOBER 1937

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The Delco Conditionair Modernizes Home Heating!

Today, the American family wants the healthful benefits of Winter Air Conditioning

Thousands of homes now equipped with this Proved Type of Winter Air Conditioning

N' )W the old-fashioned heat- ing system, with its parched stale air, gives way to /ealthful Winter Air Conditioning. The new Delco Conditionair warms and moistens the air. It filters out germ carrying dust and pollens. It gives positive air circulation and even room temperatures.

The new Delco Conditionair brings true winter air condition-

The new Delco Conditionair heats, humidities, filters and circulates air, at an initial cost no greater than some types of Automatic Heating alone. When installed with properly sized ducts and high wall registers it provides the cheapest way to add summer cooling and dehumidifying now or at a later date.

Fired by oil or gas

ing to homes costing as little as $5000. It is not a makeshift assembly of fan, spray and fur- nace. The Delco Conditionair is a thoroughly engineered unit pioneered, built and backed by General Motors. Exclusive con- struction features greatly increase economy in operation. And the initial cost is actually less than some types of automatic radiator

heating systems.

© ee The Delco Conditionair is only one of the many heating and air conditioning products of Delco- Frigidaire, the air conditioning division of General Motors... Consult Sweet’s Catalogue. Or write for more information. Our Consultation service is designed to save architects time and trouble.

Lt Vteys lo lal lo

~ Detco-FRIGIDAIRE

The Air Conditioning Division of General Motors AUTOMATIC HEATING ¢« COOLING * CONDITIONING OF AIR

AMERICAN ARCHITECT AND ARCHITECTURE, OCTOBER

1937 11

NEWS e EVENTS e FACTS e FACES T R E N D S IDEAS e OPINIONS e COMMENTS

is a “Titular Czar” in the building field . .,. a dictator to coordinate the many divisions of the industry. The case ot the Allied Armies is cited—how until Foch assumed supreme command, troops of different nations were working at cross purposes and facing defeat. The construc- tion industry, like an army, requires a correlating brain at the top, avers this writer. If we had such a guiding genius now, he says, runaway prices would be curbed, over-eager labor held in check until recovery becomes more staunchly established

Well, maybe so . . . but who’s to be Czar? Any nominations ?

A WAY TO HELP AVOID BUILDING DIS- ASTERS such as the one which recently occurred on Staten Island, N. Y., was proposed recently by Hobart B. Upjohn, Fellow of the A. I. A. and past president of the New York Chapter. In brief, Mr. Upjohn’s plan envisions creation of a new compulsory inspection service to certify compliance with the Building Code before occupancy of a structure is permitted. Says Mr. Upjohn:

“It is deplorable that lives must be sacrificed to demonstrate the existence of buildings of cheap and poor construction, yet a lethargic public does not seem to realize that the very building in which they live may be just as unsafe.

“The Staten Island houses which col- lapsed during a severe rainstorm were constructed by altering an old factory. It makes little difference whether the build- ing be a new structure or an alteration; the necessity for careful supervision of all structures to insure their erection in accordance with the Building Code is of paramount importance.

“Tt is unreasonable to expect the Build- ing Department inspectors, of whom there are a scant number, to be able to vouch for the full performance according to law, nor is it reasonable to expect that the public should bear the expense of em-

PHOTO: ACME

The turbine pits in the west power- house section of Grand Coulee Dam, Columbia River, Washington

ploying sufficient inspectors to make sure of a reasonable compliance with the law. “Even continuous inspection is not suf- ficient to guarantee 100% compliance if those in charge are bent upon skimping on the materials used in the building. “Strict honesty in complying with the law is unquestionably the best solution, but this trait is not popular in a com- petitive market. As a result, therefore, we must resort to compulsory supervision by competently trained men, whose duty and responsibility it should be to see that the law is strictly adhered to. Such in- spectors should have passed the exam-

ination of the State Board of Regents.”

Even if—for reasons of civic economy —Mr. Upjohn’s excellent plan were re- stricted to only those structures built without architectural supervision, the public would receive substantially more protection than is now afforded.

ARCHITECTURE NEEDS MORE PUBLICITY ot the kind given in “Paying Plans,” an article by Burton Ashford Bugbee ap- pearing in the September 18th issue of Collier’s. We have often wondered at architecture’s apparent indifference to the way it is presented to the public . . . why more of an attempt is not made to ham- mer into the country’s consciousness a conception of architecture’s part in the scheme of things.

Public Relations is a vital subject to corporations, industrial and many pro- fessional associations. Millions are spent yearly to acquaint Americans with the beneficent services of the telephone com- panies, the aluminum industry, the rail- roads, and so forth.

Professional associations such as the American Medical Association and American Dental Association are con- stantly on the alert to see that the coun- try is not misinformed concerning the function of doctor and dentist. Yet we are not aware of any concerted attempt on the part of architecture to see that the public is given a true picture of its value and service.

At any rate, Mr. Bugbee’s article in Collier’s is the sort of thing we like to see. Throughout he stresses the im- portance of architectural supervision in home construction.

“Your first great economy is a good architect. Far from being the luxury you may have imagined, he will save you his fee many times over before he is through. He is trained to devise a more workable, economical plan than either you or a builder could do, as any good builder will be the first to tell you. He will super- intend construction to make sure you get the workmanship and materials specified. He has a passion for sound construction and an eve for good design that will be

money in your pocket later on in the wa of low upkeep cost and easy salability.”

HOUSING

THE FIRST PWA SLUM CLEARANCE = and low-rent housing project—Techwood Homes in Atlanta—has just completed its first year of existence. In a recent re- port to Secretary Harold Ickes, Admin- istrator Howard A. Gray gives an ac- counting of the project’s progress.

At the present time, this development has 604 families occupying its 604 dwell- ings and there is a substantial waiting list of applicants for accommodations. During this first year, $159,161 was col- lected in rentals, and rent arrears amount to only $244.36 or .00154 per cent of the total income. Incomes of families in Techwood average $22.11 per week; (to obtain admittance, earnings must be less than five times the amount of rent). Tenants pay $5.52 monthly rent per room and the average size of each family is 3.24 persons.

Since its beginning the project has at- tracted hundreds of visitors. In marked contrast to the squalid areas it replaced, all buildings are fully fireproof and each dwelling is equipped with electric light- ing, mechanical refrigeration and elec- tric ranges. Heat, light, power for light- ing, cooking and refrigeration and con- stant hot and cold water are supplied to tenants for a small monthly service charge which is added to the rent. Buildings are surrounded by lawns, gardens, recrea- tional areas and walks.

The Techwood development was fol- lowed by University Homes, a_ second project in Atlanta. Other PWA _ slum clearance and low-rent housing projects have been opened in Montgomery, Ala- bama; Cleveland, Ohio; Miami and Jack- sonville, Florida; Atlantic City, N. J.; Columbia and Charleston, S. C.; Okla- homa City, Oklahoma; and Stamford, Conn. Rents have been set for nineteen projects, including those above.

PHOTO: WIDE WORLD PHOTOS, INC.

This is the sort of luminaire which will light the Golden Gate Bridge—a sodium vapor lamp of ten thousand lumens

AMERICAN ARCHITECT AND ARCHITECTURE, OCTOBER 1937

NOS ATR

Yeoh RTA Teme Ma REE Ek

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BE Mimmaesns

PI

From basement to top floor

CORK INSULATION

helps air condition this modern store

nf ff fe 4 CS ee ee ee ee ee ee es

|| ee A

= ie A 2 ee ee ee

oe ee ee eo oe ee ed

| ———

Apove—Twelve story building of People’s Outfitting Com pany, Detroit. Architect for modernization, Albert Kahn, Inc.

At Lert—(Cork-covered lines in the compressor room of the People’s Outfitting Company's Store in Detroit. Lines shown were canvas covered but not yet painted when photographed

BeLow—Are shown corkboard-insulated ducts which carry conditioned air from third floor penthouse to upper floors. Contractor for air conditioning, American Refrigerating (

ODERNIZED this spring, this 12-story building of the People’s Outfitting Company, Detroit, is air con- ditioned throughout. The air conditioning equipment, furnishes a total of 230 tons of refrigeration—55 tons for the basement and three lower floors, 175 tons for the nine upper floors. And this refrigeration is economically carried through Armstrong-insulated cold lines and ducts.

Armstrong’s Cork Covering on cold lines, Armstrong’s Corkboard on ducts, cut operating costs by guarding against refrigeration waste. Cork presents an effective barrier to the passage of heat. Equally important, it resists the moisture that is invariably encountered at low temperatures. That’s why Armstrong’s Corkboard and Cork Covering have been standard insulation for years in industries where low tem- peratures must be protected.

Let Armstrong engineers work with you in planning in- sulation. Armstrong’s Contract Department is equipped to install low temperature insulation in accordance with Arm- strong specifications—centralizing responsibility for both the insulation and its installation. Write today for @ complete details to Armstrong Cork Products Co., Bldg. Materials Div., 926 Concord St., Lancaster, Pa.

Armstrong’s CORK INSULATION

AMERICAN ARCHITECT AND ARCHITECTURE, OCTOBER 1937 : 13

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‘we wew HERMAN NELSON

AIR CONDITIONER FOR SCHOOLS...

Eliminates Overheating | ; ... Prevents Drafts | /

The New Herman Nelson Air Conditioner for Schools is an entirely new

unit designed and constructed from the ground up to maintain ideal air ri conditions in the classroom. Its exclusive “‘draw-through”’ design pre- | ( vents drafts and eliminates overheating. With the obsolete, multi-fan, ““‘blow-through”’ design, fans in the lower ee ee ee portion of the cabinet discharge cold air up through the radiator. That portion of the air which passes through the radiator at low velocity is dis- THE

ete wets fee charged into the room at a very high temperature, while that which

; 5 passes through at high velocity is discharged at dangerously low tem-

i : P ; peratures, causing drafts. If a temperature control device is used to

na ms | @ 7 " irl overcome this condition, the average temperature of all the air dis- My | = | ff charged into the room is not low enough to prevent overheating. Ni

Now Herman Nelson’s exclusive, multi-fan, ‘“draw-through”’ design assures that all the air discharged into the room is maintained at the 4 desired outlet temperature. With the blower assembly located in the

top compartment, streams of air at various temperatures drawn through the unit are thoroughly mixed in the fans immediately before being tio discharged into the room. No part of the air is colder or hotter than sig necessary to maintain the desired temperature. Only with this 7 ra “draw-through”’, multi-fan design can air, cool enough to of prevent overheating, be discharged into the class-

room without danger of drafts. Tk

AT FULL CAPACITY

Scientific design and location of the fan and motor assembly in the New Herman Nelson Air Conditioner for Schools assure most quiet operation. Locating the motor in the end compartment—out of the air stream— permits the use of larger blower assemblies, with fans running at slower tip speeds. In the past, noisy operation obtained with the motor placed in the center of the blower assembly often made it necessary to reduce capacity, resulting in drafts or overheating. 3 , eg

~ % The new design of the Herman Nelson unit THE OBSOLETE WAY

now insures quiet operation at full capacity.

ADAPTABLE TO ALL CONDITIONS

The New Herman Nelson Air Condi- engineer. A continuous supply of out-

tioner for Schools is the first unit de- signed to operate most efficiently under all conditions. Its flexibility enables it to be controlled according to any method of operation desired by the architect or

door air can be introduced into the room in any quantity, or outdoor air may be admitted only when necessary for cooling. The unit is available with either damper or radiator control.

For Complete Information Write to

THE HERMAN NELSON CORPORATION, MOLINE, ILLINOIS

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NEWS e EVENTS e FACTS e FACES T RE N D S IDEAS e OPINIONS e COMMENTS

THAT THERE IS A PLACE FOR SUCH PROJ- ECTS IS further proved by the fact that more than 78,000 families have applied for tenancy in the 21,800 dwellings which will be available upon completion of the PWA’s $134,000,000 program. In New York City more than 20,000 home seek- ers applied for accommodations in the Williamsburg Houses development, which has 1,622 dwellings. At this point, the New York Housing Authority decided to stop accepting registrations or goodness knows how many applications would have come in.

LAST MONTH THE FARM SECURITY AD- MINISTRATION opened for occupancy Greenbelt, a completely new community near Berwyn, Maryland, seven miles from Washington. The Greenbelt project which began from scratch, so to speak, represents community planning in its most intensive form. There are a total of 885 new homes in the development, simple in design yet equipped with all modern conveniences. Rentals will range from $18 to $41 per month, with an aver- age rental per dwelling unit of $31.23, in- cluding heating both dwelling and water.

Greenbelt is considered primarily as a relief project, and it is stated that the amount spent for labor has been much greater than it would have been had the economical building of low-cost homes been the sole object. Total cost amounted to an estimated $14,227,000. Of this fig- ure, 65.6% was